OKGNtech Ecosystem & Supports


Alex Goodhew
Community Manager, Accelerate Okanagan
#201-460 Doyle Avenue, Kelowna

OKGNtech Ecosystem & Supports

Time & Date: 5 PM, Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019
Location: E103, Okanagan College, Kelowna BC
Registration: https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/212563

Talk Abstract: The OKGNtech community is growing at a rapid rate with 15% economic growth year over year and over 12,000 people working at 700+ tech companies. To support this ecosystem growth, there are a range of resources, mentorship programs and funding to help entrepreneurs and their teams. Alex will be introducing the following:

  • What’s happening in tech on a broad scale
  • The OKGNtech landscape
  • Who is AO?
  • Resources for entrepreneurs
  • Funding incentives and support services for founders and their teams

Speakers Biography: Alex is the Community Manager at Accelerate Okanagan, a not-for-profit technology accelerator that supports the growth of the Okanagan innovation community. Her role involves supporting community alignment opportunities with Okanagan tech companies and supporters. The AO team also develops events, programs and initiatives geared towards supporting the growing OKGN tech community by engaging the willing, coaching the leaders and unlocking the capital. 

For further information please contact: Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org)
Refreshments  will be provided

Machine Learning and Neural Networks with R and Tensorflow Workshop

Daniel Rozek, Jesse Ayers, Jack Humphrey,  Aubrey Nickerson, Chris Mazur and Helder Necker

Computer Science Department, Okanagan College, Kelowna

IEEE Okanagan College Student Branch & IEEE Okanagan Subsection Present (co-sponsored by NSERC ARD L2 GPerf2 research project)

Machine Learning and Neural Networks with R and Tensorflow Workshop

Time & Date: 2 PM – 5 PM, Friday, November 8th, 2019
Location: E103, Okanagan College, Kelowna BC
Registration: https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/event/register/209774

Talk Abstract: We will be providing a data analysis workshop looking to introduce concepts of Machine Learning and Neural Networks using R and Tensorflow. Our presentation will go over the basic concept of Machine Learning and Neural Networks, then begin gathering and preparing data for use by different algorithms. We will look at the different methods of analysis, as well as the effect of displaying the data in different graphical formats. Finally, we will compare different tools and algorithms in terms of performance and generalizability.

This will be a “bring your own computer” event. Participants will be guided through installing R Studio and Tensorflow, downloading and preparing a data set for analysis, performing visualizations on the data, and running machine learning to create predictions using the data as training.

The main presentation link:
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1uuhbbsznmn6M7C5RE82NgKSaRooEmI_GcBou7C1IqnI/edit?usp=sharing
The Github used for R:
https://github.com/humbleguidant/RWorkshop/blob/master/RExercise.R
The Github used for Tensorflow:
https://github.com/jackrbhumphrey/TensorFlowInstallation/

R Programming Language PowerPoint Presentation.

Speakers Biography:
Daniel Rozek is a BCIS 5th-year student working part-time for the NSERC GPerf2 project.  He is interested in SQL, Databases and creating apps with Java and XML.
Jesse Ayers is a fourth-year BCIS student working as a part-time research assistant for the NSERC GPerf2 project. He has a great interest in software development and enjoys adding new technologies to his toolset to complete a project. With what little free time he has, he enjoys game development as a hobby.
Jack Humphrey is a third-year BCIS Student working as a Research Student for the NSERC GPerf2 project. Working in an industry that focuses on lifelong learning, he enjoys working on personal projects in his spare time and has recently directed his focus toward Machine Learning and Data Visualization, where he hopes to find new and intuitive ways to display information.
Aubrey Nickerson is a BCIS student working part-time as a research assistant for the NSERC GPerf2 project. He is studying in the Software Development option and enjoys creating databases, web design, and programming data structures. He is currently investigating machine learning.
Chris Mazur is a BCIS student working part-time as a research assistant for the NSERC GPerf2 project. He enjoys project management and algorithms and is investigating machine learning.
Helder Necker is a 2nd-year student and an NSERC GPERF2 research assistant, who is interested in Software Development, Artificial Intelligence and Data Analysis.

For further information please contact: Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org)
Refreshments and Pizza will be provided

Jira, Confluence and Bitbucket: A Beginner’s Approach to SW Project Management


 

 

Jack Humphrey, Chris Mazur and Aubrey Nickerson

Computer Science Department, Okanagan College, Kelowna

 

IEEE Okanagan College Student Branch & IEEE Okanagan Subsection Present (co-sponsored by NSERC ARD L2 GPerf2 research project)

Jira, Confluence and Bitbucket: A Beginner’s Approach to SW Project Management

Time & Date: 2 PM – 3:30 PM, Friday, October 25th, 2019
Location: B112, Okanagan College, Kelowna BC
Registration: http://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/meeting_registration/register/208110

Talk Abstract: We will be providing a workshop environment to present on Atlassian’s cloud-based Project Management environment, Jira Cloud. Included in this workshop will be aspects of version control in the form of Bitbucket, as well as document management through Confluence. Together, Jira, Confluence, and Bitbucket allow teams to implement an AGILE approach to project management.

This will be a “bring your own computer” event Participants will be guided through Jira and Bitbucket account creation, linking their Atlassian products, analyzing a problem to create a backlog, starting a sprint, self-assigning tasks from the backlog, utilizing Bitbucket for version control as they work together on a single file, closing their sprint, and performing a retrospective including analysis of burn-down charts and comparison of estimates to reality.

Speakers Biography:
Jack Humphrey is a third-year BCIS Student working as a Research Student for the NSERC GPerf2 project. Working in an industry that focuses on lifelong learning, he enjoys working on personal projects in his spare time and has recently directed his focus toward Machine Learning and Data Visualization, where he hopes to find new and intuitive ways to display information.
Aubrey Nickerson is a BCIS student working part-time as a research assistant for the NSERC GPerf2 project. He is studying in the Software Development option and enjoys creating databases, web design, and programming data structures. He is currently investigating machine learning.
Chris Mazur is a BCIS student working part-time as a research assistant for the NSERC GPerf2 project. He enjoys project management and algorithms and is investigating machine learning.

For further information please contact: Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org)
Refreshments will be provided

Getting Started with LaTeX Workshop


 

 

Jack Humphrey, Chris Mazur and Aubrey Nickerson

Computer Science Department, Okanagan College, Kelowna

 

IEEE Okanagan College Student Branch & IEEE Okanagan Subsection Present (co-sponsored by NSERC ARD L2 GPerf2 research project)

Getting Started with LaTeX Workshop

Time & Date: 2 PM – 3:30 PM, Tuesday, October 22nd, 2019
Location: B112, Okanagan College, Kelowna BC
Registration: https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/event/register/208035

Talk Abstract: We will be providing a workshop environment to present the document preparation tool, LaTeX, including what exactly a LaTeX document is, and why one would want to use LaTeX. Developed by the LaTeX Project and distributed for free under the LaTeX Project Public License, LaTeX uses markup tagging to define the structure of a document and was created for the production of technical and scientific documentation.

This will be a “bring your own computer” interactive workshop, where the participants will follow the presenter in order to create an IEEE-standard formatted document, including Images, Tables, References, Lists, and Sections.

Speakers Biography:
Jack Humphrey is a third-year BCIS Student working as a Research Student for the NSERC GPerf2 project. Working in an industry that focuses on lifelong learning, he enjoys working on personal projects in his spare time and has recently directed his focus toward Machine Learning and Data Visualization, where he hopes to find new and intuitive ways to display information.
Aubrey Nickerson is a BCIS student working part-time as a research assistant for the NSERC GPerf2 project. He is studying in the Software Development option and enjoys creating databases, web design, and programming data structures. He is currently investigating machine learning.
Chris Mazur is a BCIS student working part-time as a research assistant for the NSERC GPerf2 project. He enjoys project management and algorithms and is investigating machine learning.

For further information please contact: Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org)
Refreshments will be provided

New challenges and solutions to ISPs in online multiplayer gaming

Ty Sutherland
COO, WTFast, Kelowna BC

 

 

New Challenges and Solutions to ISPs in Online Multiplayer Gaming

Time & Date: 6:00–7:00 pm, Wednesday, October 2, 2019
Location: E103, 1000 KLO Rd., Okanagan College, Kelowna, BC
Registration: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/event/register/205700

Talk Abstract: Online multiplayer gaming popularity is growing rapidly. With e-sports prize purses reaching into millions there is ever-growing desire to play popular games at a competitive level.  This presents new challenges to ISPs who struggle to keep up with growing demands on their network. Network demand can cause latency on the users’ connection which results in poor game experience and ultimately losing a match. WTFast helps to alleviate the pain for users by offering optimized latency-sensitive routing via their GPN, the game player’s network.

The WTFast GPN consists of hundreds of proxy nodes around the world which users connect to using the WTFast client. WTFast subscribers’ game traffic traverses the GPN and terminates near the game servers, often in the same data centers. WTFast has been working with the Okanagan College Computer Science department and NSERC to research new ways to further optimize the service. This talk will be beneficial to anyone interested in joining the NSERC project team or who is interested in online game networks.

Speaker Biography:  Ty Sutherland is COO at WTFast located in Kelowna BC.
WTFast provides network acceleration as a service to online gamers around the world. Ty has been involved in IT service management for over 20 years and has earned CCNA, PMP, ITIL and other certifications. Ty’s a lifelong learner and finds it very rewarding to help others unlock talents and build careers.

For further information please contact: Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org)
Refreshments and Pizza will be provided

Towards Formal Methods and Software Engineering for Deep Learning: Security, Safety, and Productivity for DL Systems Development

Youry Khmelevsky
Computer Science Department
Okanagan College, Kelowna, BC, Canada

Towards Formal Methods and Software Engineering for Deep Learning: Security, Safety, and Productivity for DL Systems Development
(co-sponsored by IEEE Okanagan Subsection)

Time & Date: 7:00–8:30 pm, Monday, September 16, 2019
Location: Lecture Theatre, (PL 107), Ashnola Building, Okanagan College Penticton Campus, 583 Duncan Avenue, Penticton, BC
Note: Admission is by donation. Funds will be used to help students in need (https://ocspeakersseries.weebly.com)

Abstract:

Deep Learning (DL) techniques are now widespread and being integrated into many important systems. Their classification and recognition abilities ensure their relevance for multiple application domains far beyond pure signal processing. As a machine-learning technique that relies on training instead of explicit algorithm programming, they offer a high degree of productivity. But recent research has shown that they can be vulnerable to attacks and the verification of their correctness is only just emerging as a scientific and engineering possibility. Moreover, DL tools are not integrated into classical software engineering so software tools to specify, modify and verify them would make them even more mainstream as software-hardware systems. This talk will survey recent work and propose research directions and methodologies for this purpose.

Speaker Bio:

Youry Khmelevsky received his Ph.D. degree in computer science from the Institute of Simulation Problems in Power Industry, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. His current research interests include software engineering; cloud and high-performance computing; large Web-based information systems (Oracle, DB2, Sybase, MS SQL); no programming paradigm and source code generation from UML models and software specifications; interdisciplinary applied computer science research. Dr. Khmelevsky had served as postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University; was a Visiting Scientist in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); was an Invited Researcher at LIP6, Sorbonne University, Paris, France; held engineering and R&D positions in Industry in Europe and North America for about 15 years, including at Alberta Energy, Government of Alberta, Canada.

For further information please contact: Youry Khmelevsky (email: Youry at IEEE.org)
Registration is opened now: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/tego_/event/manage/204797

80 Years of Research on Sum of Lognormal Random Variables: Recent Breakthroughs and Applications in Wireless Communications (coming soon)

Full Professor Julian Cheng
The School of Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science, at The University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus in Kelowna, BC, Canada.

 

80 Years of Research on Sum of Lognormal Random Variables: Recent Breakthroughs and Applications in Wireless Communications (coming soon)


Time & Date: TBA, September , 2019
Location: TBA, UBC Okanagan Campus
Registration: TBA

Abstract:

The distribution for the sum of lognormal random variables finds applications in many science and engineering disciplines, and it is particularly important for wireless communication engineers. However, the distribution for the simplistic sum of independent lognormal random variables is analytically intractable, and it is more so for a sum of correlated lognormal random variables with non-identical parameters. In 1934, Wilkinson from Bell Telephone Labs first studied this problem in an unpublished work. Since then, various approximations have been proposed in the literature. All these approximations fail to accurately quantify the left tail (or right tail) behavior of the distribution function of a sum of lognormal random variables. In this talk, in the context of diversity receptions over lognormal fading channels, we first present that the left tail distribution of the sum of independent lognormal random variables can be accurately represented by a Marcum Q-function. The proposed analytical result outperforms all existing well-known sum of lognormal approximations. Using a different approach, we then extend the problem to a sum of correlated and non-identically lognormal random variables, and show that its left-tail distribution can again be represented by another Marcum Q-function. Our study reveals a number of new and surprising engineering insights into the transmission characteristics over the lognormal fading channels. For example, for the dual-branch case, we show that the outage performance of negatively correlated lognormal channels is better than that of independent lognormal channels. We also show that under certain parameter conditions, one of the two lognormal channels can contribute no performance gain to the diversity reception systems. This implies that one link can be discarded without causing asymptotic performance loss. These new findings can guide the communication engineers to design better systems for transmission over the lognormal fading channels. 

Speaker Bio:

Julian Cheng received his PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. He is currently a Full Professor in the School of Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science, at The University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus in Kelowna, BC, Canada. His current research interests include wireless communication theory, wireless networks, optical wireless communications, and quantum communications. Dr. Cheng has served as a member of technical program committee for many IEEE conferences and workshops. He co-chaired the 12th Canadian Workshop on Information Theory (CWIT 2011) in Kelowna, Canada. In 2012, he chaired the 2012 Wireless Communications in Banff, Canada. Dr. Cheng also chaired the sixth IEEE Optical Wireless Communications Symposium at the 2015 IEEE Global Communications Conference. He now volunteers as an Area Editor for IEEE Transactions on Communications. In the past, he served as an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Communications,IEEE Transactions on Wireless CommunicationsIEEE Communications Letters, and IEEE Access, and was a past Guest Editor for a special issue of IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communicationson optical wireless communications. Currently, he serves as the President of the Canadian Society of Information Theory.

For further information please contact: Julian Cheng (email: Julian.Cheng at ubc.ca) or/and Youry Khmelevsky (email: Youry at IEEE.org)
Refreshments will be provided

Artificial Intelligence, AlphaGo, and Computer Hex

Dr. Ryan Hayward

Professor

Department of Computing Science

University of Alberta

 

Artificial Intelligence, AlphaGo, and Computer Hex

Time & Date: 1 pm–2 pm, Thursday, March 29th, 2018
Location: ASC 301, UBC, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC

Talk Abstract: In 2016 DeepMind astonished the Go world with its superhuman-strength program AlphaGo. I will give a brief history of AlphaGo and discuss and its influence on current board game research, including computer Hex. Hex is the connection board game invented by Piet Hein in 1942 and introduced in North America by John Nash around 1949. Our research group at the University of Alberta has built strong Hex players and solvers.

Speaker Biography:

Ryan Hayward received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in mathematics from Queen’s University (Kingston) in 1981 and 1982 and his Ph.D. in computer science from McGill University in 1987.
His doctoral thesis, Two Classes of Perfect Graphs, was supervised by Vaclav Chvatal. From 1986 through 1989 he was assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at Rutgers University, after which he held an Alexander von Humboldt fellowship at the Institute for Discrete Mathematics in Bonn for 1989-90. From 1990 through 1992 he was assistant professor in the Department of Computing Science at Queen’s University. From 1992 he was assistant and then associate professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the University of Lethbridge, until in 1999 joining the Department of Computing Science at the University of Alberta, where he was promoted to professor in 2004.

He has supervised 13 graduate and 29 undergraduate students, some of whom later became university professors. His current research interests include algorithms for two-player games.
His group (including at times Yngvi Bjornsson, Michael Johanson, Broderick Arneson, Philip Henderson, Jakub Pawlewicz, and Aja Huang — later lead programmer of AlphaGo) has built the world’s strongest computer Hex player, and has solved two 1-move 10×10 Hex openings and all smaller-board openings. With Bjarne Toft, he is writing a book on the history of Hex,
to be published in 2018.

For further information please contact:
Dr. Yong Gao (yong.gao@ubc.ca) and Dr. Jim Nastos (jim.nastos@ubc.ca) and
Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry@ieee.org)
Registration is open now: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/170241
Refreshments will be provided

Fundamental Limits and Coding for Additive Gaussian and non-Gaussian Channels

Dr. Nghi Tran

Associate Professor

Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

The University of Akron, OH, USA

 

Fundamental Limits and Coding for Additive Gaussian and non-Gaussian Channels

Time & Date: 2:45 pm–4:15 pm, Monday, March 26th, 2018
Location: EME 4218, UBC, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC

Talk Abstract: In many communication channels, the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) has been widely used to model the receiver thermal noise. Over the last few decades, many state-of-the-art techniques have been developed to address the problem of reliable transmissions over AWGN channel links in digital communications. These developments include both information-theoretic studies and explicit source and channel coding/modulation schemes for practical purposes. As a result, effective solutions have been devised and the results can serve as the fundamental theory and practice behind many modern communication systems. While AWGN model is useful in providing an insight into the underlying behavior of communication systems, it ignores some other impairments which are prevalent in various communication environments. For instance, non-Gaussian impulsive interference caused undesirable impulse triggers in the form of random bursts that occur over short durations severely affect the throughput and reliability of many modern communication systems, including power line communications, digital subscriber lines, cognitive radio, urban and indoor wireless communications, underwater acoustic communications and so on. Non-Gaussian interference is also observed in audio, video, and imaging systems. Despite many advancements, channels under non-Gaussian interference are not fully understood, from both an information-theoretic and a practical point of view.

This talk shall provide an introduction on the well-established area of information theory and coding for AWGN channels, as well as emerging research directions in information theory and coding for non-Gaussian channels. The talk is divided in two parts. In the first part, I will introduce some introductory materials on information theory and coding designs in AWGN channels. The main focus is on the Shannon capacity and evolution of error control coding from the simplest block codes such as Hamming codes to near-Shannon limit coding schemes that have recently been invented. I also discuss the improvements of error control coding over AWGN channels during the last few decades, with respect to both the error performance and the complexity issue. In the second part of the talk, I will provide an overview of current research on information theory and coding for non-Gaussian and non-linear channels, with particular attention paid to impulsive interference channels and channels with low-resolution output quantization. I will also discuss major open research issues and directions for future research on these channels.

Speaker Biography: Dr. Tran received the B.Eng. degree from Hanoi University of Technology, Vietnam in 2002, the M.Sc. degree (with Graduate Thesis Award) and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada in 2004 and 2008, respectively, all in Electrical and Computer Engineering. From May 2008 to July 2010, he was at McGill University as a Postdoctoral Scholar under the prestigious Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Postdoctoral Fellowship. From August 2010 to July 2011, Dr. Tran was at McGill University as a Research Associate. He also worked as a Consultant in the satellite industry. Since August 2011, Dr. Tran has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Akron, OH, USA. Dr. Tran’s research interests span the areas of signal processing and communication and information theories for wireless systems and networks. Dr. Tran is currently an Editor for IEEE Transactions on Communications, an Editor for IEEE Communications Letters, an Editor for Elsevier Physical Communication, and a Lead Guest Editor for EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking, Special Issue on Full-Duplex Radio: Theory, Design, and Applications. Dr. Tran has been serving as a TPC member for a number of flagship IEEE conferences. He was a TPC co-Chair of the Workshop on Trusted Communications with Physical Layer Security for IEEE GLOBECOM 2014, a Publicity Chair of the Workshop on Full-Duplex Communications for Future Wireless Networks for IEEE ICC 2017, a Publicity Chair of the Second Workshop on Full-Duplex Communications for Future Wireless Networks for IEEE GLOBECOM 2017, and a Publicity Chair of the Third Workshop on Full-Duplex Communications for Future Wireless Networks for IEEE ICC 2018.

For further information please contact: Dr. Md. Jahangir Hossain (jahangir.hossain@ubc.ca) and
Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry@ieee.org)
Registration is open now: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/170018
Refreshments will be provided