Your First Wireless Product: Essential Things You Need to know

 

Lee

 

Lee Vishloff PEng, IEEE WCP

 

Your First Wireless Product: Essential Things You Need to know.

Time & Date: 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm, Tuesday, June 21st, 2016.
Location:
E103, Okanagan College, 1000 KLO Rd, Kelowna, BC V1Y4X8 (parking info).

Talk Abstract: That all-in-one radio IC data sheet says , “No RF experience required”. But is it true?
There are a host of things that one needs to understand when designing a wireless product.
The most important of these is making (or keeping) the product legal to sell. Then comes
performance. Poor wireless performance results in product support calls which will destroy
your profit margin and/or create many unhappy customers. In these days of high competition
and social media poorly performing products are a sure way to a quick product death.

What is Covered:
This seminar will cover the essential things you need to address in order to create a high quality
wireless product including:
1. Factors affecting radio performance
2. Regulatory requirements
3. Radio transmission basics
4. Making your product testable
5. RF issues you need to address
6. Ways to improve system availability and performance
7. Things to watch out for when using approved wireless modules.

Who Should Attend:
This seminar is relevant to:
* Designers new to wireless product development
* R&D team leaders and managers
* Product managers looking to add wireless capability to a product line
* Investors and budget managers in a company starting in wireless

Answer to the question:
Yes, but only if you don’t care about transmit power, receive performance and regulatory
approval.

Speaker Biography:  Mr. Vishloff is a wireless consultant working in the areas of cellular-based IoT solutions, short-range wireless products and EMC Consulting. He is a regular contributor to the IEEE Communications Society training program teaching several courses in Wireless Technology. He is the current chair of the IEEE Vancouver Section.

He has over 30 years of experience in wireless systems and product design. During his career he has designed a wide range of wireless products including satellite systems, terrestrial radio systems, short-range video, rural communications, aeronautical and others. Lee brings a wide range of practical experience with hands-on and management experience in wireless telecommunication systems, modem, RF, analog, digital, embedded firmware and mechanical design technologies.

Refreshments will be provided. For further information please contact:
Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org).
Registration Page: https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/40091

04/25/2016: Learning to Use Git, SourceTree, and BitBucket

IEEE Okanagan College Student Branch &
IEEE Okanagan Subsection Present

Daniel Atkinson and Martin Wallace – Okanagan College

Learning to Use Git, SourceTree, and BitBucket

Time & Date: Monday, April 25th, 2016 5:30-7:30 PM
Location: E310, Okanagan College Campus 1000 KLO Road, Kelowna, BC

Talk Abstract:
In team environments one of the greatest challenges you can encounter is how to effectively share code and resources between members or to recover from disastrous updates. Git is a version control system that effectively solves these monumental problems. Git is the most widely used version control system in the world and is used by innumerable companies and teams to distribute code and work together as a more efficient and effective whole. Of course Git is only as useful as the repository that you use to store everything and we will be covering how to use Git to interface with web repository BitBucket and how to get files into and out of a remote repository hosted on BitBucket. BitBucket is a free to use and highly versatile web-based hosting service. Finally we will be covering how to use SourceTree, a graphical Git desktop client to perform Git operations in a graphical environment.

This workshop is intended for a wide audience and assumes no previous experience with Git, BitBucket, or SourceTree. Learners will be introduced to the basics of creating a repository, pushing and pulling, and working with branches via command line and graphical user interface. At the end of the workshop, learners will be able to create and interact with repositories in two different manners and be able to collaborate with teams of any size on personal or professional projects.

Speakers Biography:
Daniel Atkinson
and Martin Wallace are students and experienced research assistants at Okanagan College in the Computer Science department. Each has used Git, BitBucket, and SourceTree on several personal and professional projects including as part of their environment for a previous NSERC research project at Okanagan College.

Refreshments will be provided. For further information please contact:
Scott Fazackerley (email: scott.fazackerley@ieee.org)
Registration Page: (https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/39657)

04/27/2016: Jira: A Beginner’s Approach to Project Management

IEEE Okanagan College Student Branch &
IEEE Okanagan Subsection Present


Ben Ward*, Parker Brown*, Garfield De’Pluzer* and Tyler Sutherland**
Computer Science, Okanagan College* & WTFast**

Jira: A Beginner’s Approach to Project Management

Time & Date: 5:30 – 7:30 PM, Wednesday April 27, 2016
Location: E310, Okanagan College, Kelowna, BC

Workshop Abstract:

We will be providing a workshop environment to share the utility of the project management tool Jira. Developed by Atlassian in response to a shift in industry standards of communication on project teams; Jira allows users to unlock the power in the AGILE development method using SCRUM style meetings as a stepping off point for organizing information.

Presenters’ Biographies:


Ben Ward
Is completing his third year towards a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Information Systems with a focus on software systems development. He has taken a keen interest in software design, artificial intelligence and revolve around procedural generation.

 

ParkerBrown

Parker Brown
Is working towards a Diploma in Computer Information Systems. Interested in metadata.

 

 

GarfieldPhoto

 

Garfield De’Pluzer
Second year student of the Network and Telecommunications Engineering Technology program with experience in network and system administration.

 

and

Tyler

 

Tyler Sutherland
Is the Project Manager of WTFast, with over fifteen years of experience leading enterprise information technology projects and managing operations.

 

 

Refreshments will be provided. For further information please contact:
Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry@ieee.org)
Registration Page: (https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/39647)

04/06/2016: Getting Started with LaTeX Workshop

IEEE Okanagan College Student Branch &
IEEE Okanagan Subsection Present

Scott Fazackerley – Okanagan College

Getting Started with LaTeX Workshop

Time & Date: 5 pm – 7 pm, Wednesday, April 6th, 2016
Location: E310, Okanagan College, Kelowna, BC

Workshop Abstract:
LaTeX (pronounced either “Lay-tech” or “Lah-tech”) is a cross-platform, portable document formatting system based on TEX (pronounced “tech”), a typesetting language originally designed especially for math and science but is commonly used in the communication and publication of scientific documents in many fields, including mathematics, physics, computer science, statistics, economics, and political science. Unlike traditional word processing, LaTeX relies on markup tagging to define the general structure of a document. While intimidating to the uninitiated user, basic mastery of LaTeX will allow a user to create well-structured and stylized documents with citations and cross-references.

This workshop is intended for a wide audience and assumes no previous LaTeX skills. In the workshop, learners will be introduced to the requirements for using LaTeX as well as building and compiling a basic document.   Learners will investigate how to create basic tables, include images and build a multi-section document.   Learners will also gain basic skills for creating documents with citations and cross references. At the end of the workshop, learners will be able to build and compile a simple LaTeX documents with bibliography.

This is a “bring your own computer” interactive event, as learners will be installing and configuring a LaTeX compiler and IDE. The event is free for all research students and IEEE members. All other participants will be $5 at the door.

Presenter Biography:
Scott Fazackerley likes LaTeX, using it on a daily basis. He is a college professor in Network and Telecommunications Engineering department at Okanagan College where he teaches client-server architecture, scripting, and security and networking in addition to being a PhD candidate at UBC, with a specific focus on data storage and analysis for low power embedded devices. Scott is a graduate of The University of British Columbia with a BSc (Honours) in Computer Science and MSc in Interdisciplinary Studies, focusing on the use of embedded systems and wireless sensor networks in the conservation, management and tracking on environmental parameters.   He continues to maintain an active research and consulting role working on collaborative projects in both industry and academia.

Refreshments will be provided. For further information please contact:
Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry@ieee.org)
Registration Page: (https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/39292)

02/18/2016: DOCSIS 3.1 – 10 Gbps over Coaxial Cable – Overview and OFDM Profile Optimization

Brian-Berscheid-Picture

 

 

Dr Brian Bersheid, Senior FPGA Developer
Vecima Networks, Saskatoon, SK, Canada

 

 

IMG_1491-2

 

 

Mr. Colin Howlett, VP Architecture
Vecima Networks, Victoria, BC, Canada

 

DOCSIS 3.1 – 10 Gbps over Coaxial Cable – Overview and OFDM Profile Optimizations

Time & Date: 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm, February 18th, 2016
Location:
EME 1151, UBC, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC

Talk Abstract: DOCSIS (Data over Cable Service Interface Specification) 3.1 is a recently developed standard for delivery of high speed data 
over coaxial cable with speeds up to 10 Gbps.  In this talk, presenters from Vecima Networks, a Victoria and Saskatoon-based 
equipment manufacturer, will provide an overview of DOCSIS 3.1 physical layer and discuss research related to optimization of 
OFDM parameters to maximize system performance within sets of modems in a cable TV serving area.

Speakers Biographies:
Brian Berscheid
is a Senior FPGA Developer at Vecima Networks.  His responsibilities are mainly focused on the development 
and implementation of signal processing functionality within Vecima’s products.  He is also heavily involved in collaborative
 research with a group of university partners with the aim of developing novel PHY and MAC layer algorithms for next generation 
cable systems.  Brian holds multiple patents and has published a number of journal papers in areas related to cable broadband 
access systems.  Brian received the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Saskatchewan and is currently 
an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan.

Mr. Colin Howlett is VP, Architecture at Vecima Networks.  Colin is responsible for defining the overall technology strategy at Vecima 
and leads a group of product architects who work directly with customers and the Vecima Research and Development team to 
define the next generation of Vecima products.  Within Vecima, Colin has held numerous positions as part of the Research and 
Development team directly involved in product development and project management before moving into his Architecture role in 
2007.  Colin has been an active participant in industry standards development within the IEEE and WiMAX Forum, and is 
currently actively involved in DOCSIS 3.1 initiatives at CableLabs.  Colin holds multiple patents related to his work in cable 
broadband access systems at Vecima.  Colin holds a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering degree and a Bachelor of Computer
 Science degree from the University of Saskatchewan.

Refreshments will be provided.
For further information please contact: Jahangir Hossain and Youry Khmelevsky
(emails: jahangir.hossain at ubc.ca and youry at ieee.org).
Registration Page: (https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/38488)

01/27/2016: Rotations in 3D Graphics Programming and the Gimbal Lock

BryanOrganized by IEEE Okanagan College Student Branch and IEEE Okanagan Subsection

Valentin Koch, Principal Research Engineer
Autodesk, Inc.

Rotations in 3D Graphics Programming and the Gimbal Lock (slides)

Time & Date: 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm, January  27th, 2016
Location:
E310, Okanagan College, 1000 KLO Rd, Kelowna, BC V1Y4X8 (parking info).

Talk Abstract: Rotations are fundamental in 3D computer programs, such as video games, 3D modelling, and embedded navigation systems. A frequent mistake in 3D graphics programming is to use the so-called Euler angles, or Euler matrices, to rotate objects around the traditional X, Y, and Z-axis. In this talk, Valentin will show why using Euler angles can lead to situations where an object loses one degree of freedom. The problem is referred to as the “Gimbal Lock”.  With some mathematical examples, Valentin will show why Gimbal Lock occurs, and will present different techniques to perform rotations in 3D that avoid the issue. This talk is for people who are interested in 3D graphics programming and have a basic understanding of Linear Algebra and matrix computations.

Speaker Biography: Valentin Koch joined Autodesk, Inc., in 2010 to help create the new road and highway optimization service. He is the product owner of the InfraWorks 360 optimization services, and he is architect of the optimization algorithms. Valentin previously worked as a consultant in operations research and optimization. He holds an MSc in mathematics and a BSc in mathematics and computer science. Valentin has published several articles in peer-reviewed journals about subjects that are related to optimization and operations research, including applications in road design optimization and resource allocations for road construction.

Refreshments will be provided. For further information please contact:
Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org).
Registration Page: (https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/38094)

01/27/2016: There and Back Again: Life at Google

BryanGardinerPhotoOrganized by IEEE Okanagan College Student Branch and IEEE Okanagan Subsection

 

Bryan Gardiner, former Googler

There and Back Again: Life at Google

Time & Date: 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm, January  27th, 2016
Location:
E310, Okanagan College, 1000 KLO Rd, Kelowna, BC V1Y4X8 (parking info).

Talk Abstract: Named Fortune’s #1 best company to work for, for six years, Google’s culture is imbued with moonshot thinking, creativity, and a sense of humour, and Googlers tackle problems at unprecedented scale. To balance a fast-paced work environment, there are many perks and opportunities for growth, both work-related and otherwise. In this talk Bryan will share highlights and lowlights, lessons and surprises on a tour through his three years as a freshly graduated software developer, working in Search and Ads at Google Seattle.

Speaker Biography: Bryan Gardiner grew up in the Okanagan and has been involved with computers for as long as he can remember. He studied at Okanagan College and UBC Okanagan and graduated in 2011 with an Honours in Computer Science and a Major in Mathematics, and performed research in computational convex analysis. He then spent a few memorable years with Google in Seattle. He also develops free software in his spare time.

Refreshments will be provided. For further information please contact:
Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org).
Registration Page: (https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/38090)

IEEEXtreme 24-Hour Programming Competition, 24 October 2015 00:00:00 UTC.

IEEEXtreme 9 Brand

IEEEXtreme is a global challenge in which teams of IEEE Student members—advised and proctored by an IEEE member, and often supported by an IEEE Student Branch—compete in a 24-hour time span against each other to solve a set of programming problems.

IEEEXtreme 9.0 will be held 24 October 2015 00:00:00 UTC.

Registration will be open through 12 October 2015.

For more information see http://www.ieee.org/membership_services/membership/students/competitions/xtreme/index.html

Students at Okanagan College will compete in E301 starting from 4 pm on 23 October 2015. Please join us.

If you have any questions, please contact to youry AT ieee.org.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Updates from the competition (4 teams of 3 undergraduate students in each, and 2 Professors, COSC, Okanagan College, Kelowna, BC):

IEEExtreme Just Started 23 Oct 2015 #1

IEEExtreme Just Started 23 Oct 2015 #1 (5 pm)

IEEExtreme Just Started 23 Oct 2015 #2

IEEExtreme Just Started 23 Oct 2015 #2 (5 pm)

 

IEEExtreme Just Started 23 Oct 2015 #3

IEEExtreme Just Started 23 Oct 2015 #3 (5 pm)

IEEExtreme Just Started 23 Oct 2015

IEEExtreme Just Started 23 Oct 2015 (5 pm)

IEEExtreme Pizza Break 23 Oct 2015

IEEExtreme Pizza Break 23 Oct 2015 (9:30 pm)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 am. Students still work:

photo 4-1 photo 2-1 photo 1-1 photo 3-1

4:30 am. still work.

photo 1-2

8 am. still have time to work.

photo 2-2

2 pm. All students are exhausted.

2pmIEEEXtreme

Reducing Access Latency in Erasure Coded Cloud Storage with Local Block Migration

DrDiNiu

 

Dr. Di Niu
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and
Computer Engineering
University of Alberta

Reducing Access Latency in Erasure Coded Cloud Storage with Local Block Migration

Time & Date: 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm, August 19th, 2015
Location: EME 1151, UBC, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC

Talk Abstract: Erasure coding has been applied in many cloud storage systems to enhance reliability at lower storage cost than replication. While a large amount of prior work aims to enhance recovery performance and reliability, the overall access delay in coded storage still needs to be optimized. As most production systems adopt a systematic code and places an uncoded block on only one server to be read normally, it is harder to balance server loads and more likely to incur latency tails than in 3-way replication, where a block can be retrieved from any of the 3 servers storing the block. In this talk, I will describe our recent work to reduce access latency in coded storage systems by moving blocks with anti-correlated demands onto same servers to statistically balance the load. We formulate the optimal block placement as a problem similar to Min-k-Partition and propose a local block migration scheme to reduce the overall access latency without globally shuffling the blocks. We derive a worst-case approximation ratio as a function of some demand statistics, such as the demand variation across different blocks. Based on request traces from Windows Azure Storage, we demonstrate that our scheme can significantly reduce access latency with only a few block moves, especially when the request demand is skewed.

Speaker Biography: Di Niu received the B.Engr. degree from the Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, China, in 2005 and the M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, in 2009 and 2013. Since September, 2012, he has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Alberta, where he is currently an Assistant Professor. His research interests include cloud computing and storage, computer networking, data mining and statistical machine learning for social economic computing, distributed optimization, and network coding. 

Refreshments will be provided. For further information please contact:
Youry Khmelevsky (email: youry at ieee.org) and to Chen Feng (chen.feng at ubc.ca)
Registration Page: (https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/35621)